13 May 2011

Temples Where Gods Come to Life


(James Estrin/The New York Times)

Temples Where Gods Come to Life, by Edward Wong (New York Times, 19 September 2008)


Excerpt:
THE god was ready for his night of conjugal bliss. The priests of the temple, muscular, shirtless men with white sarongs wrapped around their thighs, bore the god’s palanquin on their shoulders. They marched him slowly along a stone corridor shrouded in shadows to his consort’s shrine. Drumbeats echoed along the walls. Candles flickered outside the doorway to the shrine’s inner sanctum. There, Meenakshi, the fish-eyed goddess, awaited the embrace of her husband, Sundareshwarar, an incarnation of that most priapic of Indian gods, Shiva.
Link: Temples Where Gods Come to Life


In Tamil Nadu, Gods Live in Stone Temples

In Tamil Nadu, Gods Live in Stone Temples (New York Times, 19 September 2008)

Abstract:
In much of India, the gods are not creatures of distant myth to be worshiped as abstractions. Their continuous presence can be seen in the ancient, massive temple complexes of Tamil Nadu, India.
Link: In Tamil Nadu, Gods Live in Stone Temples


The Korean Dads’ 12-Step Program

The Korean Dads’ 12-Step Program, by Nicole Laporte (New York Times, 6 May 2011)

Excerpts:
A soft-spoken electrical engineer named Edmond Rhim sat in a packed gymnasium with his wife, Hanna, gripping her tiny hand in his. It was the last of four five-hour-long sessions of Father School, and by the end of the night, 70 men — all of them Korean, and almost all of them Christian — would be declared more emotionally adjusted dads. They would even get a certificate, a group photo and a polo shirt to prove it.
Link: The Korean Dads’ 12-Step Program


08 May 2011

The Gospel According to U2



Abstract:
In his book We Get to Carry Each Other: The Gospel According to U2, Greg Garrett, author and English professor at Baylor University, plumbs the U2 catalogue to reveal the group's theological worldview. He adeptly illustrates that the group has been one of the most consistent and outspoken on issues of social justice and that U2's message encourages listeners to put faith into action for the sake of the poor and marginalized. Professor Garrett is clearly a music fan, and his excitement about U2 is contagious.